How to get to Malaysia

By | May 4, 2022

Overview

Malaysia is a country in Asia according to softwareleverage. Malaysia has become one of the most sought-after travel destinations in Southeast Asia. It is a country that has its sights firmly set on the future, but which cherishes and nurtures its traditions. Trade, which has played a vital role for centuries, and the dynamic mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian and native influences have created a fascinating nation that is absolutely captivating to visitors. Malaysia is tropical islands and endless white sandy beaches, warm coral sea with first-class diving areas, orangutans, the oldest rainforest in the world, Cities with enormous skyscrapers and majestic mosques and temples and a breathtakingly beautiful coastline. As if that weren’t enough to tempt even the most discerning tourist, Malaysia’s cuisine ranks among the best in all of Asia.

Getting there

Arriving by plane

Malaysia Airlines (MH) is the national airline of Malaysia, with its main hub in Kuala Lumpur and numerous worldwide destinations, often in cooperation with other airlines. Lufthansa (LH) flies in cooperation with Royal Jordanian (RJ) from Frankfurt/M. via Bangkok and with Jetstar Asia Airways (3K) via Singapore to Kuala Lumpur. Austrian Airlines (OS) offers flights from Vienna to Kuala Lumpur with a stopover in Bangkok in cooperation with Malaysia Airlines (MH), Royal Jordanian (RJ) and Thai Airways International (TG). In cooperation with Malaysia Airlines (MH), Swiss (LX) connects Zurich with Kuala Lumpur via Bangkok.

Flight times

Frankfurt/M. – Kuala Lumpur: 12 hrs 25 mins (non-stop); Vienna – Kuala Lumpur: 14 hrs 25 mins (with stopover); Zurich – 14 hrs 20 mins (with stopover).

Departure fee

The departure tax per departing passenger is between 8 and 150 MYR (approx. 4 – 32 € or 2 – 36 CHF) at the international airports, depending on the destination and the booked flight class. Connection and transit passengers spending less than 12 hours in Malaysia and children under 24 months are exempt from the fee.

Arrival by car

By land, Peninsular Malaysia is accessible to the north from southern Thailand and to the south from Singapore. Entry into Sarawak is possible from Brunei and from the Indonesian side of Borneo (Kalimantan). Long-distance buses: Transtar Travel and Starmart Express bus companies operate services between Singapore and Malaysia. Sipitang Express connects Brunei with Sarawak. Toll: Most of the motorways are subject to tolls and on some sections of the motorway you have to pay in cash directly at the toll station; on other sections you get a ticket when you enter the motorway and pay the fee for the distance traveled when you exit. Another option is to purchase a sticker which is attached to the windshield. The Penang Bridge and the Sultan Abdul Halim Mu’adzam Bridge between the mainland and the island of Penang are also subject to tolls. Documents: In addition to the national driver’s license, the international driver’s license is required.

Arrival by train

The Malaysian States Railway (KTMB) offers regular direct services between Singapore and Thailand via Kuala Lumpur and Butterworth. The Eastern and Oriental Express luxury train offers a 41-hour round trip from Singapore via Kuala Lumpur to Bangkok and back to Singapore.

Arrival by ship

International ports are Port Penang (Georgetown), Port Klang (Kuala Lumpur), Northport and Westports (for Kuala Lumpur) and in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak) Kota Kinabalu, Lahad Datu, Sandakan, Rejang, Tawau, Labuan Island and Kuching.

Cruise ships

AIDA starts cruises with a stopover in Malaysia in Kiel and Hapag Lloyd Cruises and Cunard in Hamburg. Cruise ships such as MSC, Princess Cruises and P&O Cruises, which depart from other European ports, also call at Malaysia.

Ferry provider

Limbongan Maju ferries connect Tanjung Belungkor (Malaysia) with Changi (Singapore) several times a week (journey time: 30 minutes).

Transportation

Traveling by plane

Malaysia Airlines (MH) flies to several airports in Peninsular Malaysia, as well as in East Malaysia’s Sabah and Sarawak. Air Asia (AK), Berjaya Air (J8) and Sabah Air also serve various domestic destinations. Firefly (FY) and Malindo Air (OD) connect Kuala Lumpur to domestic destinations via the former Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah International Airport.

Traveling by car/bus

Malaysia’s road network covers around 55,000 km and is constantly being expanded. The main highway on the peninsula runs along the west coast to the border with Thailand. Sabah and Sarawak have good road links between the larger coastal cities. Tolls: Most highways in Malaysia are subject to tolls. On some motorway sections, the toll is paid in cash directly at the toll station; on other sections you get a ticket when you enter the motorway and pay the fee for the distance traveled when you exit. Another option is to purchase a sticker to put on the windshield. The Penang Bridge and the Sultan Abdul Halim Mu’ are also subject to tolls. adzam bridge between the mainland and the island of Penang. Gas stations: There are enough gas stations in urban areas, but fewer in rural areas. Travelers should therefore take advantage of the fueling options that are available.

How to get to Malaysia